News

T-1A CSO Aircraft #21 Delivered

T-1A CSO Aircraft Modifications

T-1A CSO Training Stations


The United States Air Force (USAF) took delivery of the 21st modified T-1A for Combat System Officer (CSO) training in August 2102.  Camber delivered twenty-one aircraft on schedule and under budget on the Firm Fixed Price (FFP) contract that was managed by the Systems Program Office (SPO) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio.

The USAF has been looking for ways to modernize the training segment of the navigation program for several years with the sense that there was a better method to prepare officers of varying experience and training levels and create more well-rounded personnel overall. The evolving roles and missions of existing aircraft, development of future aircraft, and the advancement and modernization of the equipment installed in aircraft flown by the USAF has radically changed the duties of flight crews, adding new responsibilities in some cases and changing roles in others.

Due to these changes and emerging weapons systems, the USAF wanted to instill officers with a wide breadth of technical knowledge and practical skills in all areas of combat operations before they became specialized in their assigned area.   In 2002, Gen. John P. Jumper initiated an update of the Navigation training and created a new officer classification which combines the roles of what had traditionally been three specialties: the Navigator, Electronic Warfare Office (EWO) and Weapons Systems Officer (WSO). This new position is the Combat Systems Officer or CSO.   To achieve the CSO training goals, the USAF utilized classroom training to teach principles, traditional simulators to teach equipment operation, and traditional flight training for hands on navigation. But what is the best way to teach students the experience of applying all of these skills including navigation, electronic warfare systems and weapons systems in a dynamic environment as a member of a flight crew?  In answering this question, the USAF  decided to update the T-1A Jayhawk to meet this need. The aircraft modification would combined the best aspects of simulation and a training aircraft into one package by adding a suite of simulated radar, electronic warfare, and navigation equipment to the T-1A, in essence replicating a large portion of the ground base simulator in the airplane.

The Air Force awarded the contract to modify the T-1A aircraft to support the CSO training requirements to Camber Corporation in March 2009. Camber’s approach to the T-1A CSO Training System presented a solution that was based on a proven on-board training system for an airborne platform that had been previously deployed and used in several countries. The approach allowed sophisticated airborne emulation of on-board tactical equipment in a realistic threat environment, resulting in an authentic experience at substantially lower risk and cost.

The program covers synthetic radar, navigation, weapons and EW training systems for the T-1A aircraft.  The aircraft suite includes the installation of two student stations (copilot position and aft cabin) hosting the simulated radar, EW, weapons and flight instrumentation applications, and two Flight Instructor operator stations.  The T-1A employs use of synthetic electronic warfare and radar databases that realistically mimic real world environments that drive simulation applications that are interoperable with the USAF’s flight and mission planning software.

According to Lieutenant Colonel Ryan Carignan, Branch Chief for the CSO Training Program, the system that is on board the now modified T-1A meets the Air Force requirement. The training that was only provided in a simulator, can now be done first in the simulator and then replicated in an airplane – which helps develop the skills, knowledge and confidence of the student.

“It’s easier to adapt to things in a simulator. However, it is a completely different story when you are actually in the airplane and you’ve got real time constraints like fuel, weather, airplane movement, and more overall pressure,” notes Carignan. “Now you can take that training and replicate it and practice it in the airplane which is more realistic than what used to be done in the airplanes’ simulators. We expect an overall more well rounded, better trained aviator from the new program.  Now every graduate will have more knowledge and greater skill sets than our previous training programs could provide, which will better prepare them for different missions in various aircraft.”

The Camber T-1A CSO effort included multiple aircraft modifications to support two students and two instructors. The first student is in the co-pilot position with an instructor sitting in the jump seat. The second student is on the right side of the cabin with an instructor across the aisle and slightly behind. Both students have displays that present the simulated equipment and a Hand Control Unit to interact with the equipment. The monitors are driven by computers installed in the avionics rack and the instructors utilize laptop computers for the Instructor Operator Stations. An observer position has also been added to the cabin with associated seating and intercom connections.

The heart of the training system is the simulation software running on the computer systems installed in the aircraft. The Camber software solution integrates to the aircraft ARINC-429 data buses to obtain aircraft position and attitude information that drives the simulation.

The airborne radar simulations are powered by Camber’s Radar Toolkit® (RTK) – the world’s leading advanced radar simulation product.  The RTK is in use on F-35, F/A-22, B-2, F16 and C-130 trainers and a variety of other trainers. The instructor has the capability to select different radar systems at each student station which provides the capability to train on both air to ground and air to air modes along with weapon deployment.

The system is interoperable with standard flight and mission planning software and includes a de-brief system which allows the instructor to play back the student’s actions while viewing the overall mission context. A key advantage of this approach is the flexibility – the instructor can select different sets of equipment to present to the student for each mission. As the students progress through the training course additional equipment is available to practice new skills.

“When you take all the different training and try to merge it into one program there are going to be challenges and sacrifices that you have to make,” noted Carignan. “From what we’ve seen, the undergraduate training has been going very well; and the success rate at follow-on FTUs has been very high.”

Camber is proud to have provided the USAF with the T-1A CSO modified aircraft on time and under budget.

Air Force uses flying simulator to prepare Combat Systems Officers

The United States Air Force (USAF) has been looking for ways to modernize the training segment of the navigation program for several years with the sense that there was a better method to prepare officers of varying experience and training levels and create more well-rounded personnel overall. The evolving roles and missions of existing aircraft, development of future aircraft, and the advancement and modernization of the equipment installed in aircraft flown by the USAF has radically changed the duties of flight crews, adding new responsibilities in some cases and changing roles in others. Global Positioning Systems (GPS) have simplified the traditional tasks of navigation for some, while advances in Electronic Warfare systems, advanced sensors and weapons have created additional responsibilities for others. Due to these changes and emerging weapons systems, the USAF wanted to instill officers with a wide breadth of technical knowledge and practical skills in all areas of combat operations before they became specialized in their assigned area.

In 2002, Gen. John P. Jumper initiated an update of the Navigation training and created a new officer classification which combines the roles of what had traditionally been three specialties: the Navigator, Electronic Warfare Office (EWO) and Weapons Systems Officer (WSO). This new position is the Combat Systems Officer or CSO. To achieve the CSO training goals, the USAF utilized classroom training to teach principles, traditional simulators to teach equipment operation, and traditional flight training for hands on navigation. But what is the best way to teach students the experience of applying all of these skills including navigation, electronic warfare systems and weapons systems in a dynamic environment as a member of a flight crew?

In answering this question, the USAF determined that flight training remains a critical part of the training process both to provide the students with that flight experience and to provide instructors with the opportunity to evaluate student performance in a more realistic situation.

To achieve this, the USAF was challenged with a way to create or modify existing aircraft to have the necessary training systems on board that can present the student with a simulated threat environment and simulated equipment that is integrated with the actual aircraft positional data. The USAF decided to update the T-1A Jayhawk to meet this need. The aircraft modification would combine the best aspects of simulation and a training aircraft into one package by adding a suite of simulated radar, electronic warfare, and navigation equipment to the T-1A, in essence replicating a large portion of the ground base simulator in the airplane.

T-1A CSO Aircraft Modifications

T-1A CSO Training Stations


The Air Force awarded the contract to modify the T-1A aircraft to support the CSO training requirements to Camber Corporation in March 2009. Camber’s approach to the T-1A CSO Training System presented a solution that was based on a proven on-board training system for an airborne platform that had been previously deployed and used in several countries. The approach allowed sophisticated airborne emulation of on-board tactical equipment in a realistic threat environment, resulting in an authentic experience at substantially lower risk and cost.

The program covers synthetic radar, navigation, weapons and EW training systems for the T-1A aircraft.  The aircraft suite includes the installation of two student stations (copilot position and aft cabin) hosting the simulated radar, EW, weapons and flight instrumentation applications, and two Flight Instructor operator stations.  The T-1A employs use of synthetic electronic warfare and radar databases that realistically mimic real world environments that drive simulation applications that are interoperable with the USAF’s flight and mission planning software.

According to Lieutenant Colonel Ryan Carignan, Branch Chief for the CSO Training Program, the system that is on board the now modified T-1A meets the Air Force requirement. The training that was only provided in a simulator, can now be done first in the simulator and then replicated in an airplane – which helps develop the skills, knowledge and confidence of the student.

“It’s easier to adapt to things in a simulator. However, it is a completely different story when you are actually in the airplane and you’ve got real time constraints like fuel, weather, airplane movement, and more overall pressure” notes Carignan. “Now you can take that training and replicate it and practice it in the airplane which is more realistic than what used to be done in the airplanes’ simulators. We expect an overall more well rounded, better trained aviator from the new program.  Now every graduate will have more knowledge and greater skill sets than our previous training programs could provide, which will better prepare them for different missions in various aircraft.”

The Camber T-1A CSO effort included multiple aircraft modifications to support two students and two instructors. The first student is in the co-pilot position with an instructor sitting in the jump seat. The second student is on the right side of the cabin with an instructor across the aisle and slightly behind. Both students have displays that present the simulated equipment and a Hand Control Unit to interact with the equipment. The monitors are driven by computers installed in the avionics rack and the instructors utilize laptop computers for the Instructor Operator Stations. An observer position has also been added to the cabin with associated seating and intercom connections.

T-1A CSO Instructor and Student station

T-1A CSO Student Station with Touchscreens


The heart of the training system is the simulation software running on the computer systems installed in the aircraft. The Camber software solution integrates to the aircraft ARINC-429 data buses to obtain aircraft position and attitude information that drives the simulation. The Electronic Warfare simulation software, the Air Combat Environment (ACE) has roots in the USAF. For the T-1A CSO, ACE provides an equipment simulation suite that includes electronic warfare sensors, an Integrated Air Defense System (IADS) simulation, navigation and weapons.

The airborne radar simulations are powered by Camber’s Radar Toolkit® (RTK) – the world’s leading advanced radar simulation product.  The RTK is in use on  F-35, F/A-22, B-2, F16 and C-130 trainers and a variety of other trainers. The instructor has the capability to select different radar systems at each student station which provides the capability to train on both air to ground and air to air modes along with weapon deployment.

Each T-1A aircraft was modified to include an ADS-B antenna that provided situational information about surrounding aircraft and providing air to air engagement training.  The system is interoperable with standard flight and mission planning software and includes a de-brief system which allows the instructor to play back the student’s actions while viewing the overall mission context. A key advantage of this approach is the flexibility – the instructor can select different sets of equipment to present to the student for each mission. As the students progress through the training course additional equipment is available to practice new skills.

“When you take all the different training and try to merge it into one program there are going to be challenges and sacrifices that you have to make,” noted Carignan. “From what we’ve seen, the undergraduate training has been going very well; and the success rate at follow-on FTUs has been very high.”

The program is 210 training days which comes out to just under a year. There are two phases: a Primary Phase where 18 different “sorties” are flown in the T-6, and the Advanced Phase where an additional 13 sorties are flown in the T-1A. This does not include the initial flight screening program, which is an introductory course to military flying consisting of 14 flight hours before undergraduate training begins.

Based on what has been see so far it is expected that the new training program will do a better job of identifying which training levels are more suited for each undergraduate student. Previously it was decided at the commissioning source which track the flight crew member student was going to take, without having any flight experience demonstrating proficiency and performance. Now everybody goes through the same curriculum and based on their performance and class ranking (cumulative score from academics, simulators, and flights), they would go to the best platforms and tracks for their fit. So the program will do a better job in that respect.

Camber delivered twenty-one aircraft on schedule with the final aircraft delivered to the USAF on 31 August 2012. The program was a Firm Fixed Price (FFP) contract managed by the Systems Program Office (SPO) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. Camber continues to support the aircraft at NAS Pensacola with a Field Service Representative and with approved ECPs to the training system.  The program is under budget and on schedule.

Camber Delivers Integrated Solutions

Camber’s Sensor Simulation Division, based in Dallas, TX, continues to provide integrated, real-time training solutions.  Camber recently provided to their customer a training solution that included visual Out-The-Window (OTW), Electro-Optical (EO), InfraRed (IR), Radar/IFF, MAD/SAD for submarine hunting, DF/SaR for locating and fixing beacons in Search and Rescue scenarios, Weapons deployment and Electronic Support Measures (ESM) solutions for a tactical training system supporting sensor operation and crew coordination objectives.

The key to the integrated systems is the use of a common, integrated, geo-specific database from which sensor run-time databases are generated.  This ensures that all run-time databases are cross-correlated with respect to elevation and features/imagery across sensor simulations.

The databases generated by Camber from satellite imagery files and high-resolution elevation data.  The imagery files are initially processed and optimized for the color OTW image.  From there, material encoding is performed for use by the EO and IR systems.  Finally, the database is converted for use by the Camber Radar Toolkit® product for the radar simulation.   The accompanying visual, EO, IR, and high-resolution SAR images of a common airport area demonstrate this correlation across several sensors.

Visual OTW Image

Infrared Image


EO Image

Radar Toolkit SAR Image


In addition, the use of a common elevation data source and polygonization process, supports cross-correlation across non-imaging EW sensors including ESM, RWR, and DF/SaR simulations as well as MAD/SAD and IFF.  Terrain occultation status of EW emitters in the tactical environment will correlate with imaging sensors.

ESM Polar Plot

Pulse Wave Analyzer


All of the software used to generate the various sensor images operate on standard COTS PC workstations and use the Windows operating system.

The Sensor Systems Division has been providing integrated solutions to customers for over 15 years.  The systems demonstrate Camber’s capability to use the latest technology, while providing low cost, real-time solutions that meet – or exceed – customer requirements.

Camber Corporation announces first flight of the modified T-1A Combat Systems Officer (CSO) Aircraft

Huntsville, Al (April 9, 2010)- Camber Corporation announced today that the T-1A aircraft with the modification to support CSO training had its first flight today, April 9, 2010. The aircraft took off at 11:16 Eastern Standard Time from Dayton International Airport and flew for 1 hour and 55 minutes. The purpose of the flight was to confirm operation of basic aircraft systems in preparation for future test flights which will concentrate on the newly added CSO training systems.

“I want to congratulate the Camber Team on a job well done! Camber, Stevens Aviation and Government personnel have worked well together. After a fast-paced year of system design, design reviews, and aircraft modifications, the first T-1A CSO aircraft completed its first flight today. We are excited about the first flight and look forward to the installation of the completed CSO software onto the aircraft so that we can test the CSO Training System.” said Albert Ojeda, USAF Program Manager.

T-1A CSO Modified Aircraft taking off from Dayton International Airport

The modified T-1A aircraft with the CSO training station is part of the USAF’s Air Education and Training Command (AETC) redesign of the current Navigator, Electronic Warfare Officer, and Weapon System Officer training pipeline in order to produce aviator’s skilled in advance navigation systems, electronic warfare, weapons deployment, and able to operate the complex systems critical to the Air Force mission.

“The successful, on schedule, initial flight paves the way for formal testing and the installation of the training system at Naval Air Station Pensacola” said Mike Pafford, Camber T-1A Program Manager.

Camber is teamed with Stevens Aviation, a leading aviation services company, who modified the T-1A aircraft at their facility in Dayton, OH, from where the modified T-1A aircraft was launched last week.

According to Ron Tennyson, Stevens Aviation Program Manager, the aircraft has been fitted with an Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast system that provides the training system with air traffic information and aircraft to aircraft data that can be used for air to air training missions.

Camber Corporation has its corporate headquarters in Huntsville, Alabama, U.S.A. Camber is a pioneer in the development of innovative training and simulation solutions for military and civil flight simulation and mission trainers. The Sensor Systems Division that is based in Dallas, Texas has been providing simulated sensor systems since 1985 and supports over 200 radar simulation systems worldwide. Their market leading Commercial-Off-the-Shelf Radar Toolkit® product serves as the basis for their reliable and cost efficient radar simulations.

Camber Corporation selected by U.S. Air Force to modify the T-1A aircraft to include Combat Systems Officer Training Station

Huntsville, Al (April 15, 2009) – Camber Corporation has been selected by the Department of the Air Force, Air Force Material Command (AFMC), Aeronautical Systems Center (ASC) to modify the T-1A aircraft to include a Combat Systems Officer (CSO) training station. The modification contract will be conducted by Camber’s Dallas based Sensor Systems Division (SSD).

The modified T-1A aircraft with the CSO training station is part of the U.S. Air Force’s Air Education and Training Command (AETC) redesign of the current Navigation/Electronic Warfare Officer training pipeline in order to produce aviator’s skills in advance navigation systems, electronic warfare and weapons deployment, enabling them to operate the complex systems critical to the Air Force mission.

The T-1A aircraft will be upgraded with a suite of simulated sensors (Radar, Radar Warning Receiver, Electronic Support Measures), countermeasures (flares, chaff), and weapon systems for two students. Provisions for two instructors will also be provided, allowing them to oversee the student actions, introduce faults into the simulated systems, and insert tactical and weather scenarios into the simulated environment. A debrief capability is also included to allow instructors to review the flight with the student in a classroom or office environment.

Camber is teamed with Stevens Aviation, who is a leading aviation services company. Stevens will conduct the physical modification of the T-1A aircraft at their facility in Dayton, OH.

For 60 years, Stevens Aviation has been committed to making its customers successful. Stevens provides factory authorized services for Bombardier, Hawker Beechcraft, and Embraer aircraft and FAR145 authorized services on Citations and other civilian aircraft. Stevens Aviation also supports the US Department of Defense on a number of significant depot maintenance, modification and upgrade programs. Stevens is a diversified aircraft service provider offering expertise in the areas of: aircraft maintenance, modification and refurbishment, aircraft sales, aircraft management, flight services, and fixed base operations.  Headquartered in Greenville, SC, Stevens operates facilities in Denver CO (BJC), Nashville TN (BNA), Dayton OH (DAY), Greenville SC (GYH) and Greer SC (GSP).

The F.A.A. approved, modified T-1A aircraft will be based at Naval Air Station Pensacola, where the CSO training will be conducted.

“This contract establishes Camber as a leading supplier and integrator of training systems for use on aircraft.” says Mike Pafford, Program Manager.

Camber is a pioneer in the development of innovative training and simulation solutions for military and civil flight simulation and mission trainers. The Sensor Systems Division that is based in Dallas, Texas has been providing simulated sensor systems since 1985 and supports over 200 radar simulation systems worldwide. Their market leading COTS Radar Toolkit® product serves as the basis for their reliable and cost efficient radar simulations. Camber’s corporate offices are located in Huntsville, Alabama, U.S.A.

Camber Provides Video Interface Panels (VIP) to the U.S. Army for Apache Helicopters

Camber’s Sensor Systems Division has successfully designed, manufactured and supplied the U.S. Army with Video Interface Panels (VIPs) for the Video Unmanned Aircraft Systems Intelligence Team Level 2 (VUIT-2) program. The VIPs are integrated into the Apache helicopters for control of the visual aids that being implemented on the aircraft.

The VIPs were discussed and ordered from Camber in October 2007 and Camber delivered the prototype boards in December 2007. Extensive testing on the boards was conducted by the U.S. Army and the boards passed with flying colors. Camber has since delivered 30 additional sets that have been installed in the Apache helicopters.

Camber Simulated Instrument Panels Delivered on U.S. Navy Training Devices

Camber recently delivered another set of simulated instrument panels for the USN P-3 Forward Deployed Trainers (FDT). These panels are part of the Sensor Station 3 (SS3) of the training device and support the Camber provided simulated sensor systems (EO, IR, Radar, ESM and MAD). The simulated instrument panels use the Camber COTS 8670 Ethernet Interface Board. This delivery follows the successful integration of Camber’s panels on the P-3 Tactical Operational Readiness Trainers (P3-TORT).

Camber Delivers IG and Sensor Software/Hardware to Taiwan

The first batch of image generation (IG), sensor (EO and IR) and radar software/hardware for the Republic of China Air Force (RoCAF) F-16 trainers was successfully delivered to Taiwan in December 2007. The software and hardware are part of an upgrade of the existing RoCAF F-16 trainers. Camber was awarded the program in April 2007 and the program includes the upgrade of 9 trainers. All of the simulated systems are based on PC workstations and use COTS software including Camber’s Radar Toolkit® software.

8670 Ethernet I/O Board Released

Camber released the 8670 Ethernet I/O Board, used to interface with various digital and analog input/outputs. The board is designed to interface with a host computer using Ethernet.

The 8670 Ethernet I/O PCB Includes:

  • 8 x 12-bit Analog to Digital Converters (ADC)
  • 8 x 12-bit Digital to Analog Converters (DAC)
  • 32 high current Discrete Outputs (DO)
  • 32 Digital Inputs (DI)
  • 32 Digital Input/Outputs (DI/O)
  • 4 Optical Encoder input ports
  • 1 Serial Port

Radar Toolkit Version 5.0 Released

Camber Corporation has released the latest improvements to their flagship radar simulation software, version 5.0 of the Camber Radar Toolkit®. Version 5.0 offers users and developers support for the newest features of the Radar Toolkit®.

The latest features include:

  • Tiled SAR support for large SAR map generation
  • NITF support
  • Increased global weather layers (20 layers instead of 4)
  • Transparency flag for more realistic SAR models
  • A joystick interface
  • A GPS input interface

Of course, these are in addition to the latest features developed under the 4.x versions:

  • UHR ISAR support
  • SAR Zoom
  • Support for up to 4096 range bins
  • Gridded expand paging for extremely high performance
  • 32-bit radar returns
  • Interpolated gridded paging support for maximum performance and flexibility
  • 64-bit Linux support
  • A GPS input interface
  • Super-cell gridded format for more efficient offline database management
  • ISAR Model Editing and Conversion utility
  • A built-in client/server interface

Camber Provides Simulation for Maintenance Training

Camber Corporation has designed an implemented several PC simulations to replace maintenance training devices at the Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC). The PC simulations combine courseware with “hands-on” capabilities within a virtual environment to fully instruct and teach students.

Camber has provided training systems at NAS Pensacola for:

  • Avionics (AV) Radar Maintenance System
  • Avaition Mechanic (AM) Hydraulic Maintenance System
  • AE Fuel Quantity System
  • AE Power Distribution System
  • AE Flaps and Landing Gear System
  • AE Jet Ignition System
  • AE Basic Electrical Systems

These PC simulations will allow Navy, Coast Guard, and Marine Corps trainees to practice organizational and intermediate level maintenance functions while in A-school, and to repeat the exercises later in their careers in preparation for advancement tests. The technology is applicable to a wide range of applications, including air, surface, and ground vehicle maintenance training.

Due to the success of the PC Simulations for the Navy’s A-school, Camber has been awarded a contract by the U.S. Navy for the supply of PC Simulations for the Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) training sytems.

Imagery-based Geo-specific Radar Landmass Database Supported by Radar Toolkit®

Camber has successfully integrated support for imagery-based geo-specific databases into the Radar Toolkit®. Support for this new paging software is offered in all current (post v4.7) versions of the Radar Toolkit®.

8510 PCI-bus Programmable Video Interface Board Released

The latest in video interface boards from Camber, 8510 Programmable Video Interface Board, has been released. The 8510 board provides the following video formats:

  • EIA-343-A, 60Hz, Interlaced, 2:1
  • VGA, 60Hz, Non-Interlaced
  • RS-170A, 60Hz, Interlaced, 2:1
  • NTSC Composite and S-Video
  • Custom Video Available

The 8510 is a PCI-bus based short board which can be set up (via software) to support various video interfaces. Linux and Windows drivers are available. The 8510 replaces Camber’s 8010 and 8020 boards.